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1961 Volvo PV544 in Holland

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Old Aug 18th, 2018, 16:43   #361
SaabPilot
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Thumbs up

Still, one can’t help being awestruck, seeing this transformation. Fantastic to “watch” you chugging away at this.

👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻

And the sooner you finish this, the sooner you’ll pick up the Landy. 🤗
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Old Aug 19th, 2018, 16:19   #362
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Originally Posted by SaabPilot View Post
Still, one can’t help being awestruck, seeing this transformation. Fantastic to “watch” you chugging away at this.

👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻

And the sooner you finish this, the sooner you’ll pick up the Landy. 🤗
Thanks for the kind words

I think "chugging" is unfortunately a realistic descriptor - I need to crack on with the paint before it gets too humid and / or too cold

For some reason or other the user name "Saabpilot" rings a bell - are you on other forums with that name?

(And yes - after all that Volvo cleaning - I'm getting ready for some serious Land Rover series challenges such as Birmabright welding and hammering out that effing bulkhead)
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Old Aug 19th, 2018, 18:56   #363
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Default More painting today

I was planning to spray the inside of the rear wing in epoxy but decided against it at the last minute because of this =>



I get feeling that many people think that once you've wire brushed down to these little black spots all is good.

I disagree - use a grinding disc to lightly remove the black wire brushed parts to see the true rust colour underneath come through =>



In this situation the pitting of the rust can not be reached by mechanical means with out grinding away loads of the good metal around.

Although I'd prefer to have all traces of rust removed before painting I think the best thing you can do is to apply some form of rust beating paint. The rust will still be there but with a bit of chemical help it should be slowed to an almost stop for a while.

Instead of using the epoxy I went for Eastwood's rust encapsulator.



Tomorrow I'll be putting seam sealant around the newly added inner wheel arch brackets and then the day after I'll be using the Ferpox single component epoxy for a bit of extra protection.

######

I also got a bit of colour sprayed on the inside of the boot lid. This is the base coat =>



I also got two coats of the high gloss anti-scratch clear coat sprayed on top of the base coat. This wasn't done with out some dust related problems (the workshop is not an ideal paint spraying place at the moment) which I'll be showing how to make good later on in the thread...

(To be continued)
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Old Aug 20th, 2018, 13:37   #364
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Rust is a conundrum.

https://garage.eastwood.com/eastwood...-vs-converter/

I'm new to this and not sure what is the best solution. I've started to use Eastwood's Fast Etch which is a phosphoric acid treatment on just about everything I paint. But I've found that it seems to works best at dissolving rust when worked over with one of those 3M abrading pads.
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Old Aug 20th, 2018, 14:01   #365
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Rust is like cancer. the only way to really cure it is to cut it out
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Old Aug 20th, 2018, 15:13   #366
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Rust is like cancer. the only way to really cure it is to cut it out
I agree in principle but as shown above there are some circumstances where 99.99% of a panel is perfectly OK but you've still got to deal with the rust spots because in the future they are probably going to be trouble. I think you have little choice (except to replace the whole thing with new) but to use some sort of rust proofing / stopping / delaying product.

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Originally Posted by blueosprey90 View Post
Rust is a conundrum.

https://garage.eastwood.com/eastwood...-vs-converter/

I'm new to this and not sure what is the best solution. I've started to use Eastwood's Fast Etch which is a phosphoric acid treatment on just about everything I paint. But I've found that it seems to works best at dissolving rust when worked over with one of those 3M abrading pads.
On the whole I think Eastwood products tend to be more or less the best you can get.

I don't like rust converters however. I think rust eating products are better such as evaporust (or the Rustyco stuff available here in the Benelux countries)

From my experiences, mechanical removal combined with a rust killing product is nearly always the most effective method available at any given time.

Once you've got as much rust removed as is humanly possible "rust sealing" products over the top help keep it at bay.

The thing I think to remember is that it is always there even if it is only a tiny spot - I don't think there is no such thing as a product that stops it for ever.


(For ever is one of those terms that can be abused - it might only mean "until I sell it and move on"!)
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Old Aug 20th, 2018, 16:13   #367
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How about Fertan? I used it on my 144. Told that the old vintage restorers swear by it.
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Old Aug 20th, 2018, 16:39   #368
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How about Fertan? I used it on my 144. Told that the old vintage restorers swear by it.
It is a converter not a rust killer.

I think you need to be careful when using converters. If you don't remove as much rust as possible by mechanical means then I have found that you're just making a cured crust on top of weak mush. The idea that these converters soak through "pore deep" I have not seen in my tests / playing about time.

Fertan would / could have been an appropriate solution to the spots of rust shown at the top of this page but again because of the nice clean metal around the spots the rust converter isn't ideal - I've noticed that rust converters really don't mix well with solid clean steel. After using a converter on an area such as that shown above you need to go over the area with a wire brush / sander to remove the converter from the clean metal. (All in all a sealing product is less hassle)

I do like the epoxy spray that is meant to go on top of Fertan => Ferpox. In my experience it has turned out to be quite a good all round single component protective layer. It isn't in the same league as the tough two pack epoxy coatings I'm now playing with but it has helped keep rust at bay on my Mercedes suspension components for the last 5+ years.

EDIT:

Fertan does seem to work though.

It reminds me a little bit of Jenolite that used to be the "thing" back in the 1990s 'cos the MOD used it once apparently...
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Old Aug 20th, 2018, 17:36   #369
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Yes Fertan say that you need to remove all the loose rust. seem to remembet that they recommended leaving on the residue, but isn't Fertan non acidic, I believe it's nicotine based.
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Old Aug 20th, 2018, 18:12   #370
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Yes Fertan say that you need to remove all the loose rust. seem to remembet that they recommended leaving on the residue, but isn't Fertan non acidic, I believe it's nicotine based.
It has been some time since I used it in anger - I can't remember the instructions so it is best to check - but I seem to remember the usual don't let it dry out and wash off with water instruction and there's probably a warning about clean non-rusty steel too.

I'm pretty sure it isn't acid based - that seems to be a rust eating / killing ingredient
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