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New (to me) 1980 Volvo 244

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Old Sep 24th, 2020, 10:17   #1751
Laird Scooby
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Thank you David for that useful post.

Has the search been raised with one of the several rather diligent among those Volvo dealers who do give a fig?

The prat (sic) number might help by the way. An interweb images search might help to identify the part.
And the number might even find a supplier. I testify that such things have happened.

Comrade Stephen Edwin



.
"original part number will be 1254057" - copy&pasted from further up - it's already been done! Skandix don't offer the genuine Volvo item again confirming the OE part is NLA, Volvo list it on volvopartswebstore.com but no price, gcp.se/en give the following response :

"Search result

Search Results for: 1254057 (Found 1 products)
Partnumber: 1254057 - Deleted part. Will not come again. - Price: 0 $"

In case you're in any doubt, gcp is the Genuine Classic Parts division of Volvo so if they haven't got it, nobody has!

Except maybe something a dealer bought in 1982 and might be listed as NOS now. That's how i managed to find the oil cooler for mine (and then it had to come from Sweden! ) but i have to re-engineer the aftermarket nipple to fit it.

It's all part of classic car ownership, you either spend years waiting for the OE part to come up at an autojumble or you find a way round it.

Bearing in mind, with something like a gas spring that deteriorates over time anyway, even a NOS item might prove useless in 2 months time.
Then you're back to square one so need to find an alternative solution, either an aftermarket direct fit solution or modifying aftermarket parts to correspond with the original.
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Old Sep 24th, 2020, 10:29   #1752
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"original part number will be 1254057" - copy&pasted from further up - it's already been done! Skandix don't offer the genuine Volvo item again confirming the OE part is NLA, Volvo list it on volvopartswebstore.com but no price, gcp.se/en give the following response :

"Search result

Search Results for: 1254057 (Found 1 products)
Partnumber: 1254057 - Deleted part. Will not come again. - Price: 0 $"

In case you're in any doubt, gcp is the Genuine Classic Parts division of Volvo so if they haven't got it, nobody has!

Except maybe something a dealer bought in 1982 and might be listed as NOS now. That's how i managed to find the oil cooler for mine (and then it had to come from Sweden! ) but i have to re-engineer the aftermarket nipple to fit it.

It's all part of classic car ownership, you either spend years waiting for the OE part to come up at an autojumble or you find a way round it.

Bearing in mind, with something like a gas spring that deteriorates over time anyway, even a NOS item might prove useless in 2 months time.
Then you're back to square one so need to find an alternative solution, either an aftermarket direct fit solution or modifying aftermarket parts to correspond with the original.


Thank you David for that useful post.

Sadly NOS doesn't usually have a use before date. But if it was from late manufacture date who knows. And you will know better than me that, part numbers get "changed" although that should not happen. I have benefited a few times from diligent dealership searching beyond just checking GCP et al. I have a bolt here that might one day benefit a 740 owner. When a diligent dealer found the new part number I bought more than one.

Comrade Stephen Edwin


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Old Sep 24th, 2020, 11:13   #1753
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Default "Olde" parts

P.S. Re Olde parts.

I know of one Volvo dealership that has a store of parts that someone might like to buy and sort .... there is a usefully huge quantity ... but it would need a concerted effort and the parts will relate to various Volvo models.

Other dealers who also do give a fig might have similar stores.

Now there's a challenge for the forum.

Comrade Stephen Edwin



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Old Sep 24th, 2020, 12:13   #1754
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You were dead right about that Dave - many thanks. I'm sure I would have thought about it before getting the drill out, but you prompted that process.

Now I just have to work out how to get those fasteners undone!

Alan

... some progress on getting the fasteners off:

The top ones (attached to the chassis) are roll pins like this:



part #951986 - which should just tap out with a drift.

I'm still struggling with the lower ones, which are called 'swivel pins' and somehow slot in.

I'll think about it during Bob's walk :-)

Alan

PS. The bungee idea worked pretty well Dave.

PPS. I'm thinking about using some universal gas struts at about a tenner a pair rather than spending a long time looking for NOS OE items (that may be no good) or aftermarket items (than may not fit).

Last edited by Othen; Sep 24th, 2020 at 12:13. Reason: Spelling error.
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Old Sep 24th, 2020, 12:46   #1755
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... some progress on getting the fasteners off:

The top ones (attached to the chassis) are roll pins like this:



part #951986 - which should just tap out with a drift.

I'm still struggling with the lower ones, which are called 'swivel pins' and somehow slot in.

I'll think about it during Bob's walk :-)

Alan

PS. The bungee idea worked pretty well Dave.

PPS. I'm thinking about using some universal gas struts at about a tenner a pair rather than spending a long time looking for NOS OE items (that may be no good) or aftermarket items (than may not fit).
Thought the bungee would work Alan, it worked well for me. I'd go for the aftermarket items and if they're wrong after matching your part number to their strut which is what i did with the 1254057 number, it's their fault so they should pay return postage and refund so you won't lose anything.
After that some universal struts would be the last resort or think about making the bugee solution permanent, perhaps by using an expansion spring in place of them.

If you can tap out the roll-pins, you should be able to prop the boot lid open with a useful broomstick or inert neighbour and see what exactly you're doing with the fulcrum fitting without turning yourself into Quasimodo by bending over at an awkward angle.
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Old Sep 24th, 2020, 13:18   #1756
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Thought the bungee would work Alan, it worked well for me. I'd go for the aftermarket items and if they're wrong after matching your part number to their strut which is what i did with the 1254057 number, it's their fault so they should pay return postage and refund so you won't lose anything.
After that some universal struts would be the last resort or think about making the bugee solution permanent, perhaps by using an expansion spring in place of them.

If you can tap out the roll-pins, you should be able to prop the boot lid open with a useful broomstick or inert neighbour and see what exactly you're doing with the fulcrum fitting without turning yourself into Quasimodo by bending over at an awkward angle.
Thanks Dave,

Good points. I'm more curious about this than I am in need of fixing the struts; they have not got any worse since I bought the RB, so maybe bolstering up the bungee idea would be okay - perhaps a bit more of a 'Charles Atlas chest expander' spring would do it?

I would like to get at least one of the struts off for a look, now I know what to look for the top ones do indeed seem to be a roll pin that should tap out with a small drift. The other end remains a mystery at the mo, but I can't help thinking there will be some really simple trick to removing them.

There is no reason whatsoever to rush and so damage something unnecessarily with this issue - slowly, slowly, catchy monkey.

Alan.
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Old Sep 25th, 2020, 12:35   #1757
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Default 244 Boot Gas Struts

In this episode of the RB Saga:

You may recall I couldn't work out how to remove the outer fixing for the RB's boot gas strut, which looked like this:



... I tapped out the inner side roll pin at the top easily enough, but that achieved nothing (you will see why later), but still couldn't see how the to unfasten the outer. I decided, rightly or wrongly (as it turns out unnecessarily) to drill the head off the fixing, that was easy enough and the rest of it tapped out. I turned out to be fixed swivel pin, pressed on in the factory. The gas strut is not bolted on at the outer side, but just rests under tension in a slot like this:



No harm done (but lots of time wasted), I had the gas strut out and replaced the pin with a bolt and nylock nut.

It turns out the inboard end is not positively fixed by the roll pin either, it just has a forked end that is held in place by the strut's own tension - so there had been no need to remove the roll pin either.

There didn't seem much wrong with the left side strut, I could barely compress it with my 15 stone, so I decided to just re-fit it. What a palaver: having replaced the roll pin the only way of fitting the strut was to compress it by about 30mm, then slide both ends into place and allow its own tension to fix it there. I used my chippy's Workmate to compress the strut then tied it up like the Xmas turkey with some thin SWR and a thimble:



(... don't look if you have a concern for health and safety).

The rest of the reinstallation was simple enough, just slide it into place with the boot held open with a yard broomstick and then release the SWR.

That had all been a bit more difficult than I intended, so I made a cuppa and thought about whether I took the other side off or not. The struts seemed to still have a good amount of pressure in them and more or less held the boot up in the right way. Getting the right side out would be difficult without either a special Volvo tool to compress the gas spring or quite a dangerous procedure to wire up the strut in its compressed position (with the boot nearly closed), then open the lid.

... I decided the strut system was nowhere near broken enough to warrant fixing, in fact it worked about 80% as well as it did when new - so I decided to try Dave's suggestion of helping the mechanism a bit with a bungee:



I must say, this works fairly well and is quite unobtrusive (in fact it stops the spare wheel rolling around), so I think I'll get some new bungees next time I'm in town and improve this method a bit.

As you may see here, the mechanism holds the hefty boot up quite well:



This is about the 80% open position, it is quite stable there. Maybe the extra weight of the spoiler is the only thing preventing 100%?

So, sometimes it is better to retrace one's steps back to the last good place, which is what I did this morn. The RB isn't a new motor car and I realised that I was being silly trying to make this fairly unimportant part work like new. It is fine the way it is, with a little help from a 1 bungee.

One last point: Mr Volvo made this one much harder than it needed to be.

:-)

Last edited by Othen; Sep 25th, 2020 at 14:24. Reason: Grammar.
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Old Sep 25th, 2020, 13:56   #1758
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One last point: Mr Volvo made this one much harder than it needed to be.
Someone once said to me that Volvo took a good, simple idea, over-engineered it then complicated the bejesus out of it. I don't think they are wrong.

However, Volvo are also guilty of the other extreme, take a simple idea, bodge it together and call it good.

Whether it lasts or not is another matter but because they've made it simply and cheaply and is (generally) a relatively unimportant part or function, it's of no real consequence as it's cheaply and easily replaced or even upgraded to something that will last.

Fortunately the over-engineering tends to be on the things that do matter like brakes, suspension, steering and so on.
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Old Sep 25th, 2020, 14:15   #1759
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Someone once said to me that Volvo took a good, simple idea, over-engineered it then complicated the bejesus out of it. I don't think they are wrong.

However, Volvo are also guilty of the other extreme, take a simple idea, bodge it together and call it good.

Whether it lasts or not is another matter but because they've made it simply and cheaply and is (generally) a relatively unimportant part or function, it's of no real consequence as it's cheaply and easily replaced or even upgraded to something that will last.

Fortunately the over-engineering tends to be on the things that do matter like brakes, suspension, steering and so on.
Good point Dave. I couldn't help thinking that it it had been a Ford there would have just been a bolt in each end and no complex mechanism.

I recall something similar, I suppose 20 odd years ago when my daily driver was a XJ40 (a car I liked a lot). One day there was a pool of ATF on the garage floor from the PAS. The local Jag workshop diagnosed a pipe that had failed (with a 'these ones always fail, the new ones are much better' - not a good thing to tell a customer with such an expensive car). The part cost something like 200 (25 years ago).

The new part arrived and it was a thing of great beauty - all stainless steel and apparently required a special Jaguar spanner to fit it. I remember thinking I'd like to take it home and display it on the mantlepiece rather than have it fitted under my car.

... again I couldn't help thinking if it had bee a Ford it would have been a length of rubber pipe with a jubilee clip at each end costing 12 (I think Ford acquired Jaguar at about the same time).

:-)

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Old Sep 25th, 2020, 17:43   #1760
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Good point Dave. I couldn't help thinking that it it had been a Ford there would have just been a bolt in each end and no complex mechanism.

I recall something similar, I suppose 20 odd years ago when my daily driver was a XJ40 (a car I liked a lot). One day there was a pool of ATF on the garage floor from the PAS. The local Jag workshop diagnosed a pipe that had failed (with a 'these ones always fail, the new ones are much better' - not a good thing to tell a customer with such an expensive car). The part cost something like 200 (25 years ago).

The new part arrived and it was a thing of great beauty - all stainless steel and apparently required a special Jaguar spanner to fit it. I remember thinking I'd like to take it home and display it on the mantlepiece rather than have it fitted under my car.

... again I couldn't help thinking if it had bee a Ford it would have been a length of rubber pipe with a jubilee clip at each end costing 12 (I think Ford acquired Jaguar at about the same time).

:-)
I liked my XJ40 a lot as well, nice cars but very expensive on parts. I know of one part common to "classic" Minis, Rover 800s and Jag XJ40s. For a Mini, "a fiver mate", for the 800, "That's 6 pounds to you" and for the Jag, "That will be 16 please sir, is that American Excess?"

Same part but produced in different colours, Mini is black, Rover is natural and Jag is red if memory serves. Out of those three, the Mini version is best because the dark pigment makes the material denser and therefore stronger/more durable. The Jag version is next best but no way am i paying 11 over odds for it!

Ford had their finger in the Jaguar pie for quite a while, building up their shares and bought them with Land-Rover from BMW in about 1997/8, hence the X-Type was launched soon after, based on a Mondeo chassis with AWD added and the Mazda-derived 2.5 V6 also used in the Probe 24v aka Mazda MX-6.

I suspect your PAS pipe needed a special Jaguar spanner simply for access, the oil pressure switch needed an "S" shaped open end spanner to remove and refit it.
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