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My way of driving and what it does to my car

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View Poll Results: This is my driving style
I drive hard, use full throttle and max revs - and have had no issues 25 6.08%
I drive hard, use full throttle and max revs - and have had problems 2 0.49%
I drive moderately hard and floor it from time to time - and have no issues 232 56.45%
I drive moderately hard and floor it from time to time - and have had problems 42 10.22%
I drive very gently, low revs and little throttle mostly - and all is OK 100 24.33%
I drive very gently, low revs and little throttle mostly - and have had problems 10 2.43%
Voters: 411. You may not vote on this poll

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Old Jul 6th, 2012, 15:41   #51
Daim
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Mine gets to temperature much more quickly than that and I drive slowly in the morning and wait for it to get to temp before I start using the full potential of the car ;-)
My WATER temperature is within minutes at it's operating temperature BUT oil takes longer... 15 minutes for OIL is a "guesitmation"
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Old Jul 6th, 2012, 22:01   #52
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Water gets tempersture from engine block so it's obvious that oil temp will be same as coolant if not higher...., it needs more time to worm up autogearbox oil.
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Old Jul 7th, 2012, 12:34   #53
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Water gets tempersture from engine block so it's obvious that oil temp will be same as coolant if not higher...., it needs more time to worm up autogearbox oil.
Nope. Oil takes a lot longer to get up to temperature compared to the water. Oil isn't warmed by the block, but by the friction it "reduces". The oil is pumped into the oil channels and into bearings. These heat it, but not loads at once. Oil can be "lightly warm" when the engine is up to operating temperature (by the water). Being more dense than water, makes it harder to heat as well.

Ever done an oil change on an engine which has been idling itself up to water temperature? The oil isn't really warm at all. Just a little more liquidy than cold.
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Old Jul 11th, 2012, 22:13   #54
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Not had mine long enough to really say(v70 2.4 auto). It does 60 mile motorway blast on a friday night and another back on a sunday night. I do drive it quite quick, and do leave to idle for min when arrived. Only real issue i have is if driven hard, ie pulling out onto busy roundabout, the box shift is very notchy, But could just be used to vans and my previous v8. Biggest problems i hadin recent years was more down to lack of use than way driven. My Rangey was driven flat out if I was on my own and it seemed to like a good thrashing, even if wallet didnt. 7mpg is always hard to swallow
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Old Jul 20th, 2012, 09:31   #55
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Nope. Oil takes a lot longer to get up to temperature compared to the water. Oil isn't warmed by the block, but by the friction it "reduces". The oil is pumped into the oil channels and into bearings. These heat it, but not loads at once. Oil can be "lightly warm" when the engine is up to operating temperature (by the water). Being more dense than water, makes it harder to heat as well.

Ever done an oil change on an engine which has been idling itself up to water temperature? The oil isn't really warm at all. Just a little more liquidy than cold.
I'm going to get a custom fit oil temp gauge. Looking on t'bay their seem to be a few kits. Might be a bit of an extreme measure just to get the temperature of the oil but I think it might do the car good?!
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Old Jul 20th, 2012, 09:49   #56
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A lot of people don`t realise that an engine will not be at it`s most efficient if it runs too cool, modern synthetic oils work best at their optimum operating temperature.
Saying that all oils, even older mineral grades are at their best between certain operating design temperatures too.
Many forms of race prepared engines monitor oil temperature for that very reason and modifications may be carried out to try to gain optimum operating temperatures. Getting the maximum achievable BHP and torque from those race motors is paramount after all.
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Old Jul 20th, 2012, 15:38   #57
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Nope. Oil takes a lot longer to get up to temperature compared to the water. Oil isn't warmed by the block, but by the friction it "reduces". The oil is pumped into the oil channels and into bearings. These heat it, but not loads at once. Oil can be "lightly warm" when the engine is up to operating temperature (by the water). Being more dense than water, makes it harder to heat as well.

Ever done an oil change on an engine which has been idling itself up to water temperature? The oil isn't really warm at all. Just a little more liquidy than cold.
I'm sorry Daim but you must have been sleeping during your physics lessons. Water is a lot denser then oil and has the highest specific heat of all fluids meaning that it takes more energy to raise it's temperature by one degree then it takes to heat the same amount of oil. The proof of density difference is in oil floating on top of water. The only difference is the areas of the engine that those fluids contact and their boiling point. oil heats up quicker but withstands higher temperatures and has better lubricating qualities.
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Old Jul 20th, 2012, 18:53   #58
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I'm sorry Daim but you must have been sleeping during your physics lessons. Water is a lot denser then oil and has the highest specific heat of all fluids meaning that it takes more energy to raise it's temperature by one degree then it takes to heat the same amount of oil. The proof of density difference is in oil floating on top of water. The only difference is the areas of the engine that those fluids contact and their boiling point. oil heats up quicker but withstands higher temperatures and has better lubricating qualities.
Then I missed that lesson.

Oil still takes longer in an engine to heat up, as it doesn't sit around the piston sleeves. If you look at where oil is in an engine and where the oil sits, they are miles from each other. The lower half of an engine (there, where the oil is located) sits below the "water line" (water is pumped mainly only around the cylinders and in the cylinder head). We all also know, that heat raises The oil below is, as said, pumped through the engine and doesn't get the same amount of heat compared to the water...

Thrus oil will also "sit a while" in the sump until it is sucked into the system. Water is constantly pumped around and through out the engine.

If you have never driven a car with a water and oil gauge (in C! Not just a scale saying "Cold-Warm-Hot") you'll not understand...
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Old Jul 20th, 2012, 20:55   #59
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Then I missed that lesson.

Oil still takes longer in an engine to heat up, as it doesn't sit around the piston sleeves. If you look at where oil is in an engine and where the oil sits, they are miles from each other. The lower half of an engine (there, where the oil is located) sits below the "water line" (water is pumped mainly only around the cylinders and in the cylinder head). We all also know, that heat raises The oil below is, as said, pumped through the engine and doesn't get the same amount of heat compared to the water...

Thrus oil will also "sit a while" in the sump until it is sucked into the system. Water is constantly pumped around and through out the engine.

If you have never driven a car with a water and oil gauge (in C! Not just a scale saying "Cold-Warm-Hot") you'll not understand...
Agreed. The hottest place that the oil encounters is turbo shaft and bearings and underside of the pistons.
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Old Jul 20th, 2012, 21:08   #60
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Agreed. The hottest place that the oil encounters is turbo shaft and bearings and underside of the pistons.
And only then the turbo shaft if the car has one. The rest, i.e. the lubrication ports in the cylinder head or the bearings of the crank, are so short "lived" that the oil will quickly cool down again.

That is why an oil temperature reader would be the cleverest thing to have in a performance car or at least a car with a little bit of "omph" Though modern cars, like the V70, S80, V60, S60, XC60 and the soon to come V40 don't have water gauges anymore...
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