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Break-in additive

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Old Feb 12th, 2024, 11:19   #1
morsing
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Default Break-in additive

'morning,

Some years ago I read about modern oils lacking Zinc (ZDDP) due to modern cars catalytic converters. I bought some break-in additive with the intention of adding some at every oil change promptly forgetting about this after the first one.

I just saw something online about synthetic oils being even worse for old engines purely because of the lack of ZDDP, so synthetic oils are still better than mineral but only provided you add the break-in additive yourself.

So, does anyone here do that?

Regards,
Henrik Morsing
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Old Feb 12th, 2024, 12:18   #2
classicswede
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The Zink is only needed for pushrod engines.

However with a freshly built engine it is good for the break in stage but after that ohc engines do not need it
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Old Feb 12th, 2024, 12:25   #3
morsing
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Quote:
Originally Posted by classicswede View Post
The Zink is only needed for pushrod engines.
That's wrong, depending on what you mean by "needed". And not really sure what push-rod would have to do with it, do you mean flat lifters?

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Henrik Morsing
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Old Feb 13th, 2024, 01:22   #4
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I know the zink part is not what does the work but that is what the marketing pushes is the zink side.

Pushrod engines (flat not roller bearing lifter) have high pressures and tend to need the higher zddp content
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Old Feb 16th, 2024, 10:19   #5
Clifford Pope
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Most older engines surely have the same basic tappet arrangement - the camshaft pushes a flat surface of some sort which then pushes either a pushrod or the valve itself. If the valve spring has the same strength then the scraping action of the camshaft lobe on the flat surface will be the same?

Some more modern designs have a roller which runs on the camshaft lobe, so the friction is reduced. But no 240s?
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Old Feb 18th, 2024, 21:15   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clifford Pope View Post
Most older engines surely have the same basic tappet arrangement - the camshaft pushes a flat surface of some sort which then pushes either a pushrod or the valve itself. If the valve spring has the same strength then the scraping action of the camshaft lobe on the flat surface will be the same?

Some more modern designs have a roller which runs on the camshaft lobe, so the friction is reduced. But no 240s?
Rocker shafts on pushrod engines are geared. You also have the weight of the pushrod and follower acting on the cam and the face is much smaller
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