Volvo Community Forum. The Forums of the Volvo Owners Club

Forum Rules Volvo Owners Club About VOC Volvo Gallery Links Volvo History Volvo Press
Go Back   Volvo Owners Club Forum > "Technical Topics" > S80 '06> / V70 '07> / XC70 '07> General
Register Members CarsBlogs Help Calendar Mark Forums Read

Notices

S80 '06> / V70 '07> / XC70 '07> General Forum for the Volvo S80 '06> / V70 '07> XC70 '07> models (V70 Generation 3)

Information
  • VOC Members: There is no login facility using your VOC membership number or the details from page 3 of the club magazine. You need to register in the normal way
  • AOL Customers: Make sure you check the 'Remember me' check box otherwise the AOL system may log you out during the session. This is a known issue with AOL.
  • AOL, Yahoo and Plus.net users. Forum owners such as us are finding that AOL, Yahoo and Plus.net are blocking a lot of email generated from forums. This may mean your registration activation and other emails will not get to you, or they may appear in your spam mailbox

Thread Informations

Auto Transmission Fluid Change

Views : 46190

Replies : 72

Users Viewing This Thread :  

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old Aug 21st, 2012, 11:17   #1
MartinK
Senior Member
 

Last Online: Jan 10th, 2019 15:27
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Edinburgh & Aviemore
Default Auto Transmission Fluid Change

This Post relates to changing the fluid on a GEN3 (2009) XC70. The Gearbox is a 6-Speed Automatic (TF-80SC).

Firstly, a big THANKS to Pete, for his thread in the GEN2 section of this Forum. Details here http://www.volvoforums.org.uk/showthread.php?t=149516

The Gearbox is supposed to be sealed for life, but many owners report changing the fluid and finding a dark sludgy liquid in there after only 50,000 miles (see Pete's thread). My own car is on 58,000 miles, and the fluid was in reasonably good shape, still reddish, and looked OK (but I don't use my car for towing, I always select neutral when stationary, most of my journeys are quite long, and rarely stop-start driving).

Preliminary Information
  • The Auto Box holds 7.0 litres of Transmission fluid JWS 3309 (according to my manual).
  • JWS 3309 is relatively hard to find (I don't think Halfords stock it!), but I used Opie Oils http://www.opieoils.co.uk/p-69402-mo...ion-fluid.aspx The Volvo part #'s are given below:

  • Unlike most gearboxes I have changed, removing the drain plug does not allow all the oil to escape, only 3 litres. There are two main procedures for changing the oil:
1. The one "drain and fill" described here, where approx 3 litres of fluid is changed at a time.
2. The "gibbons method" of flushing where a drain and fill are included in the circuit, and the car's pump moves the oil around, drawing in fresh oil, and dumping old oil. On the Volvo, you remove the line to the transmission oil cooler, and put that to waste, and have another pipe to a container of new oil into the oil cooler, when the car is started the old oil is pumped to waste, and the new oil is drawn into the system.
  • Using "drain and fill", you only change 3 litres of fluid at a time, but it is easy to do. If my maths is correct, on the first drain/fill, 43% of the oil is replaced, and on the 2nd drain/fill, 60% of the oil will have been replaced, on the 3rd drain/fill, 76% of the oil will have been replaced, and on we go...

Tools Needed

4 litres of JWS 3309 Fluid (I managed to only use 3, but see below).
Torx 55 bit for filler plug
Torx 40 bit for level check plug
17mm hex sump plug tool (like this http://www.moatdirect.co.uk/drain-pl...tool-614-p.asp )
Funnel for Refilling (see my pic below)
Torx bit (T30 I think) for Sump Guard
Bricks.

Procedure

I went for a short drive first to warm things up.
My drive is on a slight slope, so when I run the front of the car up on some bricks, the car is level, and it gives me slightly more access underneath.

First I removed the sump cover (large plastic cover underneath with 8 x TORX fasteners).

Then the Air Filter box. It's mounted on 2 rubber holders. I removed the pipe at the front (inlet) first. Then loosened the jubilee clip where the airbox goes into the large pipe along the front of the engine (and sealed both ends with cling film to make sure I didn't drop enything in there).

Now loosen the TORX 55 plug (shown here with funnel unserted for refilling):



Go under the car, and you'll see a large fastener at the bottom of the gearbox. It's a concentric drain/level plug shown here - the upper picture shows the level-plug (torx 40) and the lower picture shows the 17mm sump drain plug:



^^^ Note the sump drain plug has a "pipe" to the top of it, which sets the level.

Have a container (which will hold a minimum of 3 litres) under the drain/level plug now, and catch all the escaping oil so you can measure it later... I removed the level plug first (you have to do this anyway, to allow the 17mm tool to be inserted). When I removed my level plug, around a cupful of oil escaped (engine off, lukewarm, level ground).

Now take out the 17mm plug, and catch the escaping oil.

Measure the drained oil (mine was exactly 3 litres).

Install the drain plug (I didn't use a new washer, but I will next time) and level plug (I didn't install the level plug, and a small amount of new oil escaped when the 2nd litre was filled, before I quickly re-insetred the level plug). Both the level screw and the filler plug have re-useable rubber washers. If you are happy to measure the new oil, and confident you have added the same amount as drained, you may wish to just refill the oil with the same amount as drained, and the level should be correct (see below for the info from VADIS on oil level checking).

Using the funnel (as shown in the first image), I refilled exactly the same amount of oil as had drained (3 litres).

Torque setings for plugs:
Drain Plug 45nm
Level Plug 8nm
Filler Plug 30nm

Once refilled, re-install the filler plug, air filter box, sump guard, job done.

Future

I'll change the gearbox fluid with a fresh 3 litres every 20k miles I think - from what I have seen that will keep the fluid relatively fresh...

Next time, I'll add slightly more than the 3 litres (probably 3.2 litres, so 200ml overfilled), put the vehicle back together (except the sump cover), and perform this level check (from VADIS apparently):

Quote:
Checking the oil level
Start the engine.
Note! Leave the engine running during the entire check.
Note! The following measure must be carried out quickly to avoid overheating the fluid.
Run through all the positions between P and D on the gear selector. Stop at each position for at least 2 seconds. Perform this process twice.
Allow the transmission fluid to heat up to 50 C.
Place a lower drip shield on the floor under the vehicle.
While the engine is running, remove the integrated level plug (Torx 40).
Allow the excess fluid to run out.
When the fluid is between 50 C and 60 C, check that the transmission fluid has stopped running out and is only dropping from the level plug hole.
Caution! It is essential the temperature not exceed 60 C, as this can result in the transmission fluid level being too low.
Fit the integrated level plug (Torx 40).
I should expect that following this procedure, (obviously without a workshop diagnostic tool, we can't check oil temperature, but realistically, "lukewarm" should be fine) that around 200ml (i.e the amount I purposely overfilled by) of fluid will run out of the level plug, and the level will be set correctly.

The car does drive better since the fluid was changed, the gearchange does seem smoother.

Last edited by MartinK; Aug 21st, 2012 at 13:12.
MartinK is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to MartinK For This Useful Post:
Old Sep 5th, 2012, 11:39   #2
PeteB1
VOC Member
 
PeteB1's Avatar
 

Last Online: Apr 24th, 2017 16:04
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Malvern
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MartinK View Post
.................I always select neutral when stationary, most of my journeys are quite long, and rarely stop-start driving).............
Thanks for the detailed follow-up but is the above a good idea, even if not regular stop/start?

AFAIAA, there used to be a stop-neutral feature in the control software for the 5 speed but it was removed as it apparently was thought to cause more rather than less gearbox wear over time.

This has been well discussed in the Volvo XC forums. Maybe there were other issues too, e.g. probematic valve body problems but I'd understood the stop-neutral feature to be a problem.
__________________
'07 P2 Willow Green XC70 D5 (185), 6 speed Geartronic, SE, As standard.
PeteB1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 5th, 2012, 13:16   #3
MartinK
Senior Member
 

Last Online: Jan 10th, 2019 15:27
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Edinburgh & Aviemore
Default

Seems to be a much-discussed issue.

There's no suggestion that auto transmission wear is increased if the car is left in D (some people say that moving the selector constantly between N and D in stop-start traffic actually increases wear). However I would assume that because the viscous coupling is engaged and working when D and stationary, that it will increase temperatures, and hence "wear" the oil.

So if I'm stationary for more than a few seconds, I select N and put the handbrake on. If it's likely to be more than a minute, I'll also stop the engine.

I don't like (and it's not considerate, and contradicts the Highway Code) to sit with my foot on the footbrake giving the people behind a face-full of red brakelights for more than a couple of seconds once stationary.
MartinK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 5th, 2012, 15:57   #4
PeteB1
VOC Member
 
PeteB1's Avatar
 

Last Online: Apr 24th, 2017 16:04
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Malvern
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MartinK View Post
Seems to be a much-discussed issue.

There's no suggestion that auto transmission wear is increased if the car is left in D (some people say that moving the selector constantly between N and D in stop-start traffic actually increases wear). However I would assume that because the viscous coupling is engaged and working when D and stationary, that it will increase temperatures, and hence "wear" the oil.

So if I'm stationary for more than a few seconds, I select N and put the handbrake on. If it's likely to be more than a minute, I'll also stop the engine.

I don't like (and it's not considerate, and contradicts the Highway Code) to sit with my foot on the footbrake giving the people behind a face-full of red brakelights for more than a couple of seconds once stationary.
Regarding holding on brakes, I always put the handbrake on too rather than holding on the footbrake for the same reasons. It probably beneficial anyways with these given the known H/B shoe issues.

Regarding 'D' vs 'N', I don't know but tend to hold in 'D' at idle unless it's likely to be for a longer time (minutes) then I switch off and go to 'P'.
__________________
'07 P2 Willow Green XC70 D5 (185), 6 speed Geartronic, SE, As standard.
PeteB1 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to PeteB1 For This Useful Post:
Old Sep 5th, 2012, 18:41   #5
GrantA
Master Member
 
GrantA's Avatar
 

Last Online: May 10th, 2019 09:02
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Inverness, Scotland
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MartinK View Post
Seems to be a much-discussed issue.

There's no suggestion that auto transmission wear is increased if the car is left in D (some people say that moving the selector constantly between N and D in stop-start traffic actually increases wear). However I would assume that because the viscous coupling is engaged and working when D and stationary, that it will increase temperatures, and hence "wear" the oil.
That's what it said in my Mercedes Owner's Manual, if stopped at traffic lights or for short periods do not move the shift out of D as this causes excessive wear but obviously if you are stuck in a traffic jam then better not to stay in D as the oil will get churned up but it should never get so hot it will "wear the oil". To provide drive from the engine the oil in an automatic gearbox is continually sheared or cut this is a design feature of the oil it is specifically designed to take a lot of punishment, yes it will get hot but to cause the oil to deteriorate quickly you would need to tow a large load continuously. A lot of vehicles with auto boxes these days are sealed for life but what the manufacturers don't say is if the vehicle is used for towing or used in harsh conditions (excessive temperatures [hot or cold] or dusty conditions) then the oil should be changed more often. The oil in my Mercedes auto box was changed for the first time at 120,000 miles and it came out runny and dark red, the mechanic said "you have a towbar but you don't tow a lot with this car do you?". He said if I had towed a lot it would have been thick and "gungy". After the oil change there was little difference in the gear change but there again it was a Mercedes and the auto box was always pretty smooth on gear change.
__________________
2009 XC70 Geartronic SE Lux (185HP at the moment......)
Porsche sold looking for a P1800.......
GrantA is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to GrantA For This Useful Post:
Old Sep 6th, 2012, 11:28   #6
PeteB1
VOC Member
 
PeteB1's Avatar
 

Last Online: Apr 24th, 2017 16:04
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Malvern
Default

I've always thought of the process of moving from 'N' to 'D' (and back) in an automatic with clutch/brake bands when stationary as being similar to the manual engagement/release of the clutch in a manual when stationary except it is done through servo's and hydraulics . Each time it is performed, there is some wear on the bands so the more often it is performed, the more accumulated wear over many thousands of miles. Replacement of the bands when sufficiently worn to require it is obviously a major operation. Therefore, even if the oil does deteriorate faster if regular and frequent stop/start driving is done without leaving 'D', it is cheaper/easier to replace as and when necessary.

However, my analogy with a manual clutch and my idea of what causes autobox component wear could be completely wrong so I may be unwittingly doing more damage by keeping mine in 'D'.

I'm not sure what happens though in a modern automatic fitted with auto engine switch off when stationary/restart when ready to move again as this would also necessitate 'D' to 'N' switching and back.
__________________
'07 P2 Willow Green XC70 D5 (185), 6 speed Geartronic, SE, As standard.

Last edited by PeteB1; Sep 6th, 2012 at 11:31.
PeteB1 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to PeteB1 For This Useful Post:
Old Sep 4th, 2014, 13:00   #7
tt82
Forum Support Team
 
tt82's Avatar
 

Last Online: Nov 19th, 2019 15:36
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Here.... obviously!
Default

I've just followed Martin's excellent guide to do a drop and fill on my 09 V70 D5. Really easy to follow and not that hard to do.

My fluid came out a deep purplish colour so I think it was due. I did have it done by a Volvo Independent specialist back in March 2013 when the car was on 92,000 miles. My only concern is that I've put 3L in but seem to have only collected 2.5L. There was a little bit of spillage but I don't think it could account for 0.5L. The question is, have I overfilled it or has the Indy underfilled it?

I'm planning on going for a drive this evening before repeating the process tomorrow so I will see what happens then. Whether the volumes match after I've done another change!
__________________
The more people I meet, the more I like my dog!


tt82 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to tt82 For This Useful Post:
Old Sep 4th, 2014, 14:05   #8
MartinK
Senior Member
 

Last Online: Jan 10th, 2019 15:27
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Edinburgh & Aviemore
Default

I would see how the car feels when driving. Hopefully when you repeat the process tomorrow, you'll measure 3L...
__________________
2009 XC70SE Geartronic
MartinK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4th, 2014, 14:47   #9
tt82
Forum Support Team
 
tt82's Avatar
 

Last Online: Nov 19th, 2019 15:36
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Here.... obviously!
Default

Well the plan is to do quite a few miles tonight, see how it drives and get the fluids nice and mixed ready for tomorrow! Given that it's 120k old and only had one drop and fill, I wanna do another and change a lot of the fluid before I start doing yearly/bi yearly drop and fills!
__________________
The more people I meet, the more I like my dog!


tt82 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4th, 2014, 15:58   #10
I-S
Premier Member
 

Last Online: May 15th, 2020 08:40
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Huddersfield
Default

Was the fluid hot when you levelled it, as if it was hot levelled by the Indy, and you cold levelled it, that could possibly account for 0.5l - I'm not sure though.
I-S is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to I-S For This Useful Post:
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 14:21.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.