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Brake Light Switch

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Old Jan 9th, 2016, 13:05   #1
Splinelube
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Default Brake Light Switch

Could someone tell me if the brake light switch - later model from year 1966 - is removed from the interior of the car or from the engine compartment? Thanks in advance.
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Old Jan 9th, 2016, 18:22   #2
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as I recall the transition from hydraulic pressure sensing switch locate on a brass brake line junction block in the engine bay, possibly on the firewall, to a mechanical switch under the dash triggered by the brake pedal was 66/67.

have a look in both places and see what you have, if you can't determine, post a few pics.
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Old Jan 9th, 2016, 19:11   #3
Ron Kwas
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SL;

C1800 has it right...changeover from earlier hydraulically activated (located at hyd brake distribution block on firewall behind engine) to later mechanically activated (located in pedal box of footwell) BLSW took place in 66-67' (market dependent).

I have been on a campaign to get owners with hyd type to change over to the later type for reliability and other advantages, since I recognized the safety disadvantages of the hyd switches years ago. See: http://www.sw-em.com/safety_bulletin_4.htm

Further suggested reading: http://www.sw-em.com/hydraulic%20bra...es%20notes.htm

Cheers
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Old Jan 11th, 2016, 19:30   #4
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Thanks to C1800 and Ron for your replies. Problem solved, was oil/grease buildup on both electrical contacts. No disassembly required.
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Old Jan 11th, 2016, 20:51   #5
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Sl;

Congrats on locating and repairing, and thanks for following up with a report of findings.

Be aware...if "oil/grease buildup on both electrical contacts" is enough to prevent electrical contact, the spring preload of push-on terminal (which should be present!) must not have been very good, because by design, pushing on terminals should cut through oxidation and surface contamination to allow contact of clean metal surfaces. This means after cleaning terminals of switch, you may want to (at the very least) squeeze terminals to restore some preload, and (at the very most) replace crimps with new! ...and of course: Apply ACZP!

Suggested reading: http://www.sw-em.com/voltage_drop_in...sh_on_terminal

Finally, you may have restored Brake Light function, but you haven't removed any of the known weaknesses. Please keep upgrading in mind as a future safety and reliability improving option!

Cheers
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Old Jan 13th, 2016, 05:57   #6
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Ron
On your brake switch upgrade do you supply a bracket suitable for a RHD car?
Russ
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Old Jan 13th, 2016, 13:56   #7
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Ron, Regarding the OxGard product you prefer; is product compatible with all electrical metal interfaces? For instance I believe the battery post contacts would not be aluminum to same or to copper. I do not know the metallurgy of the contact behind the gauges and the ignition wires. Is there any interface where this product would be harmful. My experience with aluminum and copper only involves household wiring but I believe that each of these may have some conduction issues from time to time. Thanks
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Old Jan 13th, 2016, 14:42   #8
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Russ; Yes, development of RHD kits is finished at this time...awaiting delivery. LHD kits are not suitable due to space issues.

SL; There is (thankfully) no aluminum used in the electrical systems of our cars, only copper (wiring and some terminals), brass (terminals), tin (terminals and plating on some copper terminals), steel (studs for connections for ring terminals and chassis), lead (bat post and clamps)...I think that lists most if not all of them...

ALL of these metals are compatible with and will benefit from the long-term protection ACZP formulations give on reassembly (connection surfaces should be clean and free of corrosion/contamination first!). Ox-Gard and Penetrox A are suitable. Noalox is not.

See: http://www.sw-em.com/Comparison%20of...c%20Pastes.htm

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Old Jan 13th, 2016, 16:08   #9
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Great. Have located OxGard locally. Looks like a busy weekend.
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Old Jan 18th, 2016, 17:16   #10
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SL;

Going back to your post No.7, Aluminum wiring in domestic (residential) or any electrical systems for that matter, particularly when in contact with dissimilar copper is known to be a problem in waiting...and unless you're in the Mohave desert, where rate of corrosion is quite reduced due to the RH seldom being over 3% (we know you're in PA), Galvanic corrosion IS occurring at some rate, so it wouldn't be a bad thing for you to inspect your load center for Alu wiring and if found, proceed with some preventative maintenance (at all ends of it, not just within load center) BEFORE problems arise!

Recommended Reading: http://inspectapedia.com/aluminum/Al..._Reduction.php

Cheers from Connecticut!
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